Saturday, 23 May 2015

Imitation Games

When did I get into the fake business? I’d always thought of myself as an honest person. Imitation designer bags, shoes, belts as well as accessories like sunglasses and jewellery; counterfeiting of any kind ruins the (fashion) industry and I’d always promised myself I would never get into that kind of imitation game. 
Louis Vuitton raises awareness with brochures about the issue.

A little while ago, however, it all kind of changed. For months I’d been dreaming about the Dior Tribal Earrings. A nice piece of - what luxury brands make consumers believe - exclusive jewellery design. The double pearled earring is simply irresistible and original as it takes a new stance on „closure”. Before I continue be aware that the explanation is kind of technical; a pearl fixes the stud, which brings the focus to the back of the earlobe instead of the front. The result is amazingly cool and beautiful. Furthermore it’s clear that the Mise en Dior Earrings have contributed to the revival of pearl ear studs and that way have given a classic, stylish piece of jewellery yet another chance to conquer all (over again). 

In New York (last summer) I visited the Dior stand at Barneys, unfortunately the earrings were kind of expensive (as could be expected from such an high-end brand). Sad sad sad … Meanwhile fake ones (no Dior, false silver, synthetic pearls) were lurking at me way too many times in way too many shopping windows. Still I managed to resist. Until I discovered a set of double pearled earrings with an authentic nacre and sterling silver pearl. Couldn’t resist any longer. They were fabulous and I wouldn’t take them off. Besides the price-quality ratio was definitely okay. What was not to like about that? Why would one NOT buy these beauties, given the love and treasure hunt that had preceded the actual „discovery”? Next thing I remember is me paying for (and thus buying) the precious studs.

And that is how I got mixed up in counterfeiting. But then again: what exactly defines something as fraudulent imitation? Dior might have set the standard last year; my pair is brandless, doesn’t have a fake Dior logo and is made from genuine materials. I guess it’s simple: it’s about a set of very nice earrings that were created to share with the „working class people” the joy and happiness that brings finalizing all your outfits with it. Anyhow, this is one way (my way) of getting away with the guilt that sneaks in, at times, when I’m wearing my new pair of favourite earrings. 

P.S. Do you possess any imitation goods?

No comments:

Post a Comment